First Sunday after the Epiphany

The Baptism of Our Lord

This Sunday we have another major epiphany in the life of Jesus. The Wisemen spoke about Jesus being a King. Today we learn about the Sonship of Jesus through his baptism by John as told in the Gospel of Luke.

John was preaching a baptism of repentance. Nevertheless, Jesus, who was without sin, asked to be baptized by John. From the Gospel of Luke:

Now when all the people were baptized, and when Jesus also had been baptized and was praying, the heaven was opened, and the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form like a dove. And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.”   (Luke 3:21-22)

If our baptism is like the baptism of Jesus then God tells us that he loves us and has chosen us. God spoke through the Prophet Isaiah:

Do not fear, for I am with you;
    I will bring your offspring from the east,
    and from the west I will gather you;
I will say to the north, “Give them up,”
    and to the south, “Do not withhold;
bring my sons from far away
    and my daughters from the end of the earth —
everyone who is called by my name,
    whom I created for my glory,
    whom I formed and made.”   (Isaiah 43:5-7)

We are not to be fearful, but, rather, to put our trust in God. We are assured by the Apostle Paul that our baptism is linked to the baptism of Jesus:

Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? Therefore we have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life.

For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly be united with him in a resurrection like his.   (Romans 6:3-5)

Is baptism a onetime occurrence in the life of a believer? Or is it an ongoing process? Perhaps that depends on who does the baptism. From Luke we read:

As the people were filled with expectation, and all were questioning in their hearts concerning John, whether he might be the Messiah, John answered all of them by saying, “I baptize you with water; but one who is more powerful than I is coming; I am not worthy to untie the thong of his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire. His winnowing fork is in his hand, to clear his threshing floor and to gather the wheat into his granary; but the chaff he will burn with unquenchable fire.”  (Luke 3:15-17)

Jesus baptizes with the Spirit and fire. Baptism apparently has something to do with purification. That purification is the fire of God burning in our hearts.

Do we accept our baptism the way Jesus did? Do we value it? Are we willing to fully participate in it? God has forgiven us for our sins through the blood of Jesus. He also wants to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we believed that God loves us then we will not hide from him. We will hide in him. That is one of the primary meanings of our baptism.

Let us follow the example of our Lord Jesus. He needed baptism because he needed the guidance of the Holy Spirit and his power while he was here on earth. We, too, need the assurance of God. God tells us he loves us. We need his guidance by the Holy Spirit. And we need the power of God in our lives to sustain us as we struggle in a fallen world.

What about the baptism of fire? God the Father does not condemn us. Our condemnation occurred on the cross of Christ where Jesus bore our sins. God does convict us of sin. From we read:

If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he who is faithful and just will forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness.   (1 John 1:8-9)

The psalmist told us that we “should not fear for God is with us.” If we believe that then we will fully submit ourselves to him in faith, knowing that he has our best interests at heart. We have his promise: “I will never leave you or forsake you” (Hebrews 13:5). The Apostle Paul writes:

I am confident of this, that the one who began a good work among you will bring it to completion by the day of Jesus Christ.   (Philippians 1:6)

Thus, we see that our baptism is the beginning of God’s work in us. We are to live in the promise of our baptism so that God can complete his work in us. We are a work in progress. Let us continue in faith, knowing that God is completing the work of the cross. The blood of Jesus removed our condemnation. That is true. The blood of Jesus is also continually cleansing from all unrighteousness. We are being reformed in the image of Christ Jesus. Thanks be to God who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.

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Filed under Epiphany, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year C

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