Monthly Archives: August 2018

Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 16B

Track 1: Glory Filled the House

1 Kings 8:[1, 6, 10-11], 22-30, 41-43
Psalm 84 or 84:1-6
Ephesians 6:10-20
John 6:56-69

Today we have an account of how the glory of God came down at the dedication of the Temple by King Solomon in Jerusalem. From 1 Kings we read:

Solomon assembled the elders of Israel and all the heads of the tribes, the leaders of the ancestral houses of the Israelites, before King Solomon in Jerusalem, to bring up the ark of the covenant of the Lord out of the city of David, which is Zion. Then the priests brought the ark of the covenant of the Lord to its place, in the inner sanctuary of the house, in the most holy place, underneath the wings of the cherubim. And when the priests came out of the holy place, a cloud filled the house of the Lord, so that the priests could not stand to minister because of the cloud; for the glory of the Lord filled the house of the Lord.   (1 Kings 8:1, 6, 10-11],

This was not the first time that the children of Israel experienced the glory of God. In the wilderness they experienced it. From Leviticus we read:

Aaron lifted his hands toward the people and blessed them; and he came down after sacrificing the sin offering, the burnt offering, and the offering of well-being. Moses and Aaron entered the tent of meeting, and then came out and blessed the people; and the glory of the Lord appeared to all the people. Fire came out from the Lord and consumed the burnt offering and the fat on the altar; and when all the people saw it, they shouted and fell on their faces.   (Leviticus 9:22-24)

The Hebrew word used for glory is כָּבוֹד (kavod).” It can also mean “importance”, “weight”,  or “heaviness.” This is not surprising. The glory of God was often experienced by the people as a weight which came upon them, often forcing them to the ground. The priests in Solomon’s Temple could not stand because of the weight.

During the Azusa Street Revival of  that took place in Los Angeles in 1906, the glory of God entered the sanctuary. Quite often, however, as people approached the location of the revival they fell to the ground on the sidewalk and repented before they even reached the sanctuary. They experienced the weight of God’s glory.

Do we experienced such a phenomenon in our churches today? So we experience the severance and awe brought on by the weight of God’s glory? I am afraid that we may be experiencing a different sort of weight. There is another weight which brings compromise and complacency. This is the weight of today’s culture. It is the weight of the 501 3c contract that our churches have made with the federal government. The church in America used to be the moral compass of the people. Now are we afraid to speak out on important issues for fear of losing our tax exemption status? Have the commandments of God been classified as “hate speech?” The temptation is to be culturally relevant has, no doubt, guided the direction in which our churches  are going.

We need another great revival. We need reformation in our churches. This is coming because many intercessors have prayed for it. Once more the presence of the glory of God will be experienced in the church, But, before that occurs there will be judgment. The Apostle Peter wrote:

For the time has come for judgment to begin with the household of God; if it begins with us, what will be the end for those who do not obey the gospel of God?   (1 Peter 4:17)

We are already seeing the judgment of God upon some churches. Many church leaders are being exposed for their wickedness and corruption. Many churches need a housecleaning.

The psalmist wrote:

How dear to me is your dwelling, O Lord of hosts!
My soul has a desire and longing for the courts of the Lord;
my heart and my flesh rejoice in the living God.

The sparrow has found her a house
and the swallow a nest where she may lay her young;
by the side of your altars, O Lord of hosts,
my King and my God.

Happy are they who dwell in your house!
they will always be praising you.   (Psalm 84:1-3)

Evil is on the rise. Our churches will need to be sanctuaries from a wicked world. Again the psalmist wrote:

For one day in your courts is better than a thousand in my own room,
and to stand at the threshold of the house of my God
than to dwell in the tents of the wicked.

For the Lord God is both sun and shield;
he will give grace and glory;

No good thing will the Lord withhold
from those who walk with integrity.

O Lord of hosts,
happy are they who put their trust in you!   (Psalm 84:9-12)

Let us continue to pray for our churches. And let us be willing to fall upon the weight of the glory of God as he removes from us the shackles of the world.

 

 

 

Track 2: Put on the Whole Armor of God

Joshua 24:1-2a,14-18
Psalm 34:15-22
Ephesians 6:10-20
John 6:56-69

We live in a difficult and dangerous world. This is particularly true for Christians. The Apostle Paul warned that we must put on the whole armor of God so that we may be able to stand in the Faith. Paul writes:

Be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his power. Put on the whole armor of God, so that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. For our struggle is not against enemies of blood and flesh, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers of this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places. Therefore take up the whole armor of God, so that you may be able to withstand on that evil day, and having done everything, to stand firm. Stand therefore, and fasten the belt of truth around your waist, and put on the breastplate of righteousness. As shoes for your feet put on whatever will make you ready to proclaim the gospel of peace. With all of these, take the shield of faith, with which you will be able to quench all the flaming arrows of the evil one. Take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.   (Ephesians 6:10-17)

Jesus warned his disciples that there will always be tribulation for those who profess him as Savior and Lord. We cannot go it alone and survive. The psalmist wrote:

The righteous cry, and the Lord hears them
and delivers them from all their troubles.

The Lord is near to the brokenhearted
and will save those whose spirits are crushed.

Many are the troubles of the righteous,
but the Lord will deliver him out of them all.   (Psalm 34:17-19)

In John’s Gospel Jesus made this promise to us:

The hour is coming, indeed it has come, when you will be scattered, each one to his home, and you will leave me alone. Yet I am not alone because the Father is with me. Ihave said this to you, so that in me you may have peace. In the world you face persecution. But take courage; I have conquered the world!”   (John 16:32-33)

Will we stand with the Lord when it no longer popular to do so? That day is here!

There are special times in life when we must whom we will serve. In the wilderness, as preparation for entering the promised land, Joshua told the children of Israel that they must choose whom they will serve:

Joshua gathered all the tribes of Israel to Shechem, and summoned the elders, the heads, the judges, and the officers of Israel; and they presented themselves before God. And Joshua said to all the people, “Thus says the Lord, the God of Israel:

“Now therefore revere the Lord, and serve him in sincerity and in faithfulness; put away the gods that your ancestors served beyond the River and in Egypt, and serve the Lord. Now if you are unwilling to serve the Lord, choose this day whom you will serve, whether the gods your ancestors served in the region beyond the River or the gods of the Amorites in whose land you are living; but as for me and my household, we will serve the Lord.”

We must make a quality decision. In a difficult age when the culture against us, are we willing to follow the Lord? If so, then we must put on the full armor of God because we are entering enemy territory warfare.

How do we fight this war? Winning battles begins with ourselves. We must put on the breastplate of righteousness. We must be committed to living holy lives. If not, we will be no different than the world around us. How could we expect anyone to follow our example? Holy living is our best defense.

What about offense? Our weapons are not carnal. We do not win by arguments or persuasion. Rather, we must depend on the word of God. Paul wrote:”Take the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.” God’s words are so much more powerful than our words.

The Apostle Peter also wrote:

Now who will harm you if you are eager to do what is good? But even if you do suffer for doing what is right, you are blessed. Do not fear what they fear, and do not be intimidated, but in your hearts sanctify Christ as Lord. Always be ready to make your defense to anyone who demands from you an accounting for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and reverence. Keep your conscience clear, so that, when you are maligned, those who abuse you for your good conduct in Christ may be put to shame.   (1 Peter 3:13-16)

Despite our best efforts, and even with the guidance of the Holy Spirit, some people may just not respond to the Gospel message. At times, we may find ourselves standing alone for the Gospel. What do we do then? We are reminded what the Apostle Paul wrote:

Therefore take up the whole armor of God, so that you may be able to withstand on that evil day, and having done everything, to stand firm.   (Ephesians 6:13)

Leave a comment

Filed under homily, Jesus, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year B

St Bartholomew, Apostle

saint-bartholomewAn Israelite in Whom There Is No Deceit

Today we celebrate the life and ministry of the Apostle Bartholomew, also called Nathanael. Little is know of him. We do know that he recognized Jesus as the Son of God from the beginning and that Jesus, Himself, testified to his good character. Reading from today’s Gospel of John:

Philip found Nathanael and said to him, “We have found him of whom Moses in the Law and also the prophets wrote, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph.” Nathanael said to him, “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” Philip said to him, “Come and see.” Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him and said of him, “Behold, an Israelite indeed, in whom there is no deceit!” Nathanael said to him, “How do you know me?” Jesus answered him, “Before Philip called you, when you were under the fig tree, I saw you.” Nathanael answered him, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!” Jesus answered him, “Because I said to you, ‘I saw you under the fig tree,’ do you believe? You will see greater things than these.” And he said to him, “Truly, truly, I say to you, you will see heaven opened, and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man.”   (John 1:45-51)

Bartholomew was a person of integrity. He was able to deal openly and honestly. He was willing to follow Jesus without a great deal of persuasion, no matter the cos. For these reasons, Jesus was able to prophecy that extraordinary things would take place in his life and ministry.

Nevertheless, there was a cost for Bartholomew for having been chosen. The Apostle Paul spells out some of this cost in his First Epistle to the Corinthians:

I think that God has exhibited us apostles as last of all, as though sentenced to death, because we have become a spectacle to the world, to angels and to mortals. We are fools for the sake of Christ, but you are wise in Christ. We are weak, but you are strong. You are held in honor, but we in disrepute. To the present hour we are hungry and thirsty, we are poorly clothed and beaten and homeless, and we grow weary from the work of our own hands. When reviled, we bless; when persecuted, we endure; when slandered, we speak kindly. We have become like the rubbish of the world, the dregs of all things, to this very day.   (1 Corinthians 4:9-13)
God gave to Bartholomew the grace to believe and to preach His Word under all circumstances. He travelled extensively as a missionary. Many miracles were attributed to his ministry. Tradition has it that Bartholomew was martyred for the Faith. Our prayer for the Church today is that we may recognize the Messiah, as Bartholomew did, and follow through on our calling. As Bartholomew, are we willing to pay any price?

Leave a comment

Filed under Feast Day, Holy Day, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, St. Bartholomew, Year B

Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 15B

Track 1: Asking for Wisdom

1 Kings 2:10-12; 3:3-14
Psalm 111
Ephesians 5:15-20
John 6:51-58

The psalmist wrote:

The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom;
those who act accordingly have a good understanding;
his praise endures for ever.   (Psalm 111:10)

Without an appreciation and reverence for the wisdom of God and his understanding, we may not realize that limitations of our human wisdom and knowledge. As Solomon began his reign on the throne of his father David, he understood that he needed help.

In a dream God came to him and asked what he could do for Solomon. From 1 Kings we read:

At Gibeon the Lord appeared to Solomon in a dream by night; and God said, “Ask what I should give you.” And Solomon said, “You have shown great and steadfast love to your servant my father David, because he walked before you in faithfulness, in righteousness, and in uprightness of heart toward you; and you have kept for him this great and steadfast love, and have given him a son to sit on his throne today. And now, O Lord my God, you have made your servant king in place of my father David, although I am only a little child; I do not know how to go out or come in. And your servant is in the midst of the people whom you have chosen, a great people, so numerous they cannot be numbered or counted. Give your servant therefore an understanding mind to govern your people, able to discern between good and evil; for who can govern this your great people?”   (1 Kings 3:5-14)

Solomon lacked wisdom to govern the people but he was wise enough to understand that.  He needed God’s wisdom. Is that true for us or are we capable of going it alone? It would seem that many people are going along today. Or their thinking and understanding may be governed by what they are hearing other people are saying. Satan knows how to sow disinformation and lies. What the world is saying is not what God’s Word is saying.

In the Book of James we read:

If any of you is lacking in wisdom, ask God, who gives to all generously and ungrudgingly, and it will be given you. But ask in faith, never doubting, for the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea, driven and tossed by the wind; for the doubter, being double-minded and unstable in every way, must not expect to receive anything from the Lord.   (James 1:5-8)

God is generous in sharing his wisdom when we ask him, as he did for Solomon. But Satan not only sows disinformation and lies, he also sows doubt. Does God even exist? If so, does he even care? Three is a sea of doubt all around us. If we are not careful, it will toss us to and fro. All of us have doubt, but it comes unbelief when we do not feed on the word Of God, but on the propaganda of this age.

The Apostle Paul warned:

Be careful then how you live, not as unwise people but as wise, making the most of the time, because the days are evil. So do not be foolish, but understand what the will of the Lord is.   (Ephesians 5:15-17)

How we live will be determined by our spiritual intake. What is our spiritual diet today? Are we feeding on the Word of God? How about the body and blood of Jesus? Are we feeding on him on a regular basis? In today’s Gospel we read:

The Jews then disputed among themselves, saying, “How can this man give us his flesh to eat?” So Jesus said to them, “Very truly, I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life, and I will raise them up on the last day; for my flesh is true food and my blood is true drink. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood abide in me, and I in them. Just as the living Father sent me, and I live because of the Father, so whoever eats me will live because of me. This is the bread that came down from heaven, not like that which your ancestors ate, and they died. But the one who eats this bread will live forever.”

This is not a time for disputing and doubting. We are living in a critical and difficult time. We need the full nourishment of God. Otherwise, we will surely be tossed about. God the Father wants so much to share his wisdom with us. Jesus wants us so much to feed on him. Let us acknowledge our need for God and let us return to him with all our hearts. Amen.

 

 

 

Track 2: An Invitation from God 

Proverbs 9:1-6
Psalm 34:9-14
Ephesians 5:15-20
John 6:51-58

God is calling us. Do we hear him? He says:

“Come, eat of my bread
and drink of the wine I have mixed.
Lay aside immaturity, and live,
and walk in the way of insight.”   (Proverbs 9:5-6)

God is offering us a great feast. He is that great feast. We have nothing to do but come. Through the Prophet Isaiah God offered this invitation:

Ho, everyone who thirsts,
    come to the waters;
and you that have no money,
    come, buy and eat!
Come, buy wine and milk
    without money and without price.   (Isaiah 55:1)

Jesus was in Jerusalem with his disciples for the Festival of Booths. He gave out this invitation to all:

On the last day of the festival, the great day, while Jesus was standing there, he cried out, “Let anyone who is thirsty come to me, and let the one who believes in me drink. As the scripture has said, ‘Out of the believer’s heart[l] shall flow rivers of living water.’”    (John 7:37-38)

Are we ready for the great day of the Lord? Are we ready to eat the food that Jesus has prepared for us?

Jesus said to them, “Very truly, I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life, and I will raise them up on the last day; for my flesh is true food and my blood is true drink. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood abide in me, and I in them. Just as the living Father sent me, and I live because of the Father, so whoever eats me will live because of me. This is the bread that came down from heaven, not like that which your ancestors ate, and they died. But the one who eats this bread will live forever.”   (John 6:53-58)

Clearly Jesus is talking about the Holy Communion or Eucharist. This meal is a foretaste of the heavenly banquet we will be experiencing with Christ as the redeemed of the Lord. We have eternal life through our faith in the Lord Jesus. That life, however, begins now.

God’s invitation for his heavenly banquet has already gone out. He has invited us to join him in Holy Communion which is preparation for the heavenly banquet. Jesus said: “Do this in remembrance of me.” Whenever we partake of the Communion we are reminded of the unconditional love and mercy of Christ, and his great sacrifice for us on the cross. It is the love of Christ that constrains us from doing wrong. We need to be reminded often.

We remember the parable that Jesus told about the wedding banquet. Some of the people who were invited were just too busy or distracted to come. Is that us? God offers us an invitation but he cannot make us come. He is continually calling us. God does not give up on us. Jesus said that he would never leave us or forsake us.

Nonetheless, at the end of the Book of Revelation we have this final reminder of God’s invitation:

The Spirit and the bride say, “Come.”
And let everyone who hears say, “Come.”
And let everyone who is thirsty come.
Let anyone who wishes take the water of life as a gift.   (Revelation 22:17)

Are we hungry for God? Our we thirsty for God? Our daily diet today will help determine what  our eternal celebration will be.

Leave a comment

Filed under homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year B