Daily Archives: April 1, 2018

Resurrection Sunday: Easter Evening Service

Word and Sacrament

Jesus resurrection appearance to those travelers on the road to Emmaus has great theological significance. They were met by Jesus, who listened to their stories concerning the resurrection. The travelers were unable to understand or believe what had happened. Along the way, Jesus was able to open the scriptures to the travelers and their hearts burned within them.. They wanted to hear more and encouraged Him to continue talking to them:

As they came near the village to which they were going, he walked ahead as if he were going on. But they urged him strongly, saying, “Stay with us, because it is almost evening and the day is now nearly over.” So he went in to stay with them. When he was at the table with them, he took bread, blessed and broke it, and gave it to them. Then their eyes were opened, and they recognized him; and he vanished from their sight. They said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road, while he was opening the scriptures to us?” That same hour they got up and returned to Jerusalem; and they found the eleven and their companions gathered together. They were saying, “The Lord has risen indeed, and he has appeared to Simon!” Then they told what had happened on the road, and how he had been made known to them in the breaking of the bread.  (Luke 24:28-35)

It is clear that the travelers were seekers of the truth. That is an ingredient that only we can provide. God will do the rest, but He depends on us to seek after Him. Often we may be confused, yet such confusion should lead us to search out the truth. The Apostle Paul explains that we must be open to new revelations concerning Christ:

Clean out the old yeast so that you may be a new batch, as you really are unleavened. For our paschal lamb, Christ, has been sacrificed. Therefore, let us celebrate the festival, not with the old yeast, the yeast of malice and evil, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.   (1 Corinthians 5:7-8)

Jesus did not fully reveal who He was until the breaking of the bread. This was the first service of Holy Communion after Jesus was raised from the dead. When Jesus broke the bread, which symbolized the breaking of His body upon the cross, the eyes of the travelers to Emmaus were opened. That is when they could say: “The Lord has risen indeed.”

Word or Sacrament – which one is significant? The answer is both. The worship of the Church is about Word and Sacrament preaching and the Holy Communion. For many churches the Holy Communion is still controversial and often misunderstood. Nonetheless, the travelers to Emmaus found that the communion which Jesus celebrated with them at table was an eye opener.

They were eagerly anticipating the fulfillment of the scripture about which Jesus spoke. Through a reenactment of Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross these travelers were able to understand His message. In other words, it took a supernatural event for them to fully grasp who Jesus was and what His ministry was about.

As disciples of Christ, we do not want to rule out any way that Jesus choses to speak to us. Let us have open hearts and eager expectations for a revelation of our risen Lord. He will reveal Himself to us but first He needs our fullest attention. Then when we see Him let us proclaim:

The Lord has risen indeed.

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Resurrection Sunday: Principal Service, Year B

For Whom Are You Looking?

A pall or shroud has been cast over all people. That covering weighs us down. Job of the Old Testament asked:

If mortals die, will they live again?
    All the days of my service I would wait
    until my release should come.  (Job 14:14)

We can imagine infinite life. It is something most people would want. But we cannot achieve it on this earth. We eventually die. Science is always looking for a way round death. Some are saying that our consciousness could morph into a computer somehow. Is there a way to become immortal? What is standing in our way?

God had told Adam and Eve that they could eat fruit from any tree in Garden of Eden except one tree. If they ate of that tree they would die. We remember that Satan tricked us:

But the serpent said to the woman, “You will not die; for God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.”   (Genesis 3:4-5)

Satan lied when he said we would not die, because sin is what causes death. Science looks for wisdom around death. Satan promised we would have the wisdom of God. But our so-called wisdom falls short.

Only God can solve our predicament. He revealed his plan through the Prophet Isaiah:

On this mountain the Lord of hosts will make for all peoples
    a feast of rich food, a feast of well-aged wines,
    of rich food filled with marrow, of well-aged wines strained clear.
And he will destroy on this mountain
    the shroud that is cast over all peoples,
    the sheet that is spread over all nations;
    he will swallow up death forever.
Then the Lord God will wipe away the tears from all faces,
    and the disgrace of his people he will take away from all the earth,
    for the Lord has spoken.
It will be said on that day,
    Lo, this is our God; we have waited for him, so that he might save us.
    This is the Lord for whom we have waited;
    let us be glad and rejoice in his salvation.  (Isaiah 25:6-9)

Salvation was coming by God’s plan. In the fullness of time, God would send his Son into the world that death and the fear of death would be eradicated, along with all sin. Everyone who calls upon the name of the Lord would be saved.

The Apostle Peter, by revelation from God, gained an understanding of the universality of God’s plan. When God revealed to him that even Gentiles could be saved, he proclaimed:

They put Jesus to death by hanging him on a tree; but God raised him on the third day and allowed him to appear, not to all the people but to us who were chosen by God as witnesses, and who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. He commanded us to preach to the people and to testify that he is the one ordained by God as judge of the living and the dead. All the prophets testify about him that everyone who believes in him receives forgiveness of sins through his name.”   (Acts 10:39-43)

On the morning of his resurrection Jesus appears to Mary Magdalene. It was his first resurrection appearance. We have the account in the Gospel of John. Mary is distraught because she believed that someone has stolen the body of Jesus from the tomb. Then she has an encounter with Jesus, whom she thought might be a gardener. Jesus asked Mary Magdalene: “Whom are you looking for?”

When Mary discovers that Jesus has risen from the dead her whole life changed. As prophesied by Isaiah: “The Lord God will wipe away the tears from all faces.” Jesus then told Mary:

“Go to my brothers and say to them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’”   (John 20:17)

Jesus is not the only one who is resurrected. He has gone before so that we may follow him. We, too, have been raised up with him if we receive this message by faith.

Whom are we looking for today? Does science offer us hope of immortality? Can we discover the miracle cure that extends our lives indefinitely? Many people are looking in the wrong place. Such wishful thinking is really a denial of sin.

No one can solve the problem of death who does not first solve the problem of sin. Only Jesus has solved them both:

For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.   (Romans 6:23)

Jesus has removed the disgrace of our sins. He has fulfilled the promise of Isaiah.

Thanks be to God, the Lord Jesus Christ is risen! The Lord has risen indeed! Are we ready to tell others this good news? It is the message which

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Resurrection Sunday: Easter Early Service

Freedom from Fear

One of the following readings from the Old Testament:

Genesis 1:1-2:4a [The Story of Creation] 
Genesis 7:1-5, 11-18, 8:6-18, 9:8-13 [The Flood] 
Genesis 22:1-18 [Abraham’s sacrifice of Isaac] 
Exodus 14:10-31; 15:20-21 [Israel’s deliverance at the Red Sea] 
Isaiah 55:1-11 [Salvation offered freely to all] 
Baruch 3:9-15, 3:32-4:4 or Proverbs 8:1-8, 19-21; 9:4b-6 [Learn wisdom and live]
Ezekiel 36:24-28 [A new heart and a new spirit]
Ezekiel 37:1-14 [The valley of dry bones] 
Zephaniah 3:14-20 [The gathering of God’s people] 

Romans 6:3-11 
Matthew 28:1-10 
Psalm 114

Hallelujah, the Lord is risen! The Lord is risen indeed, Hallelujah! Today we celebrate the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ. The good news of the Gospel is that his resurrection is also our resurrection. The Apostle Paul writes:

Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? Therefore we have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life. For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly be united with him in a resurrection like his.   (Romans 6:3-11)

Jesus died for us so that we will no longer be slaves to sin and death. Again, Paul writes:

We know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body of sin might be destroyed, and we might no longer be enslaved to sin. For whoever has died is freed from sin. But if we have died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him. We know that Christ, being raised from the dead, will never die again; death no longer has dominion over him. The death he died, he died to sin, once for all; but the life he lives, he lives to God. So you also must consider yourselves dead to sin and alive to God in Christ Jesus.   (Romans 6:3-11)

Slavery to sin and death engenders fear. Fear had taken over the disciples of Jesus after his crucifixion, In their minds all had been lost. The miracle worker was with them no more. It took his resurrection appearance to change their fear and sorrow into joy.

The women had gone to Jesus’s tomb on the first day of the week. That is when they had an encounter with the risen Lord. We read in Matthew:

Suddenly Jesus met them and said, “Greetings!” And they came to him, took hold of his feet, and worshiped him. Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid; go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me.”   (Matthew 28:9-10)

We live in a fearful world today. But as Christians, we do not have to live in fear. If we are still living in fear then what we need is a personal resurrection appearance. We may or many not see him in his physical person, but his Spirit has entered our hearts provided that we look to him alone for forgiveness and salvation.

A personal resurrection appearance can be blocked if we are still clinging to the old self which refuses to die. It is time to turn away from our flesh. It does not satisfy us. In fact, it enslaves us by fear. Isaiah wrote:

Ho, everyone who thirsts,
come to the waters;

and you that have no money,
come, buy and eat!

Come, buy wine and milk
without money and without price.

Why do you spend your money for that which is not bread,
and your labor for that which does not satisfy?   (Isaiah 55:1-2)

The joy of Easter is the old self cannot live when we worship the risen Lord. The flesh cannot survive the joy of the resurrection. Today, Jesus is saying to us: “Do not be afraid.” Let us listen for his voice. He will appear to us and will say: “Go and tell others that you have seen me.”

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