Third Sunday after the Epiphany, Year B

Follow Me

There are times when the call of God may interrupt our lives. This was true for Simon and his brother Andrew. From today’s Gospel we read:

As Jesus passed along the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And Jesus said to them, “Follow me and I will make you fish for people.” And immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went a little farther, he saw James son of Zebedee and his brother John, who were in their boat mending the nets. Immediately he called them; and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired men, and followed him. (Mark 1:16-20)

These fishermen left their nets and their livelihood to follow a man whose purpose and direction was unknown to them. Nevertheless, they were able to put their trust in him.

The Prophet Jonah was called by God to go to the city of Nineveh. In this case, Johan understood what God was asking but he did not like it. As we remember, he ran in the other direction from Nineveh. Nineveh was a notorious city. It was hated by the Jews for good reason. How could God be asking him to preach revival to this city Jonah must have thought.

When God calls us he does not easily give up. From Jonah we read:

The word of the Lord came to Jonah a second time, saying, “Get up, go to Nineveh, that great city, and proclaim to it the message that I tell you.” So Jonah set out and went to Nineveh, according to the word of the Lord. Now Nineveh was an exceedingly large city, a three days’ walk across. Jonah began to go into the city, going a day’s walk. And he cried out, “Forty days more, and Nineveh shall be overthrown!” And the people of Nineveh believed God; they proclaimed a fast, and everyone, great and small, put on sackcloth.   (Jonah 3:1-5)

God may give us impossible assignments. If the calling is from God then it is guaranteed to be impossible without his help. What is amazing about many biblical examples of the calling of God led to the fulfillment of impossible tasks. Nonetheless, the obedience of those who were called was absolutely essential.

What keeps us from obeying the call of God? We remember the rich young man who wanted to follow Jesus but had too many possessions to give up. God has blessed our nation. Worldly possessions may just be a hindrance to us in answering God’s call.

The Apostle Paul wrote:

I mean, brothers and sisters, the appointed time has grown short; from now on, let even those who have wives be as though they had none, and those who mourn as though they were not mourning, and those who rejoice as though they were not rejoicing, and those who buy as though they had no possessions, and those who deal with the world as though they had no dealings with it. For the present form of this world is passing away.   (1 Corinthians 7:29-31)

Paul was saying: ignore the circumstances in which you may find yourself. This world is passing away anyway. Follow God.

Our obedience to God can help to bring great changes in the lives of others. When God calls us he calls us for a reason. His reason is well beyond ourselves. Do we value his agenda more than our own? Do we love others the way he loves us?

In the case of Noah, a great city was saved:

When God saw what they did, how they turned from their evil ways, God changed his mind about the calamity that he had said he would bring upon them; and he did not do it.   (Jonah 3:10)

Our calling may not be as significant as Noah’s. We may not think that we are great prophets or preachers, but who are we to say? Some of the apostles were simple fishermen. The important thing is that they were obedient to their calling and their calling changed the whole world.

The Season of the Epiphany is a time to listen to God. What is he asking us to do? If it were not important he would not be asking us.

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Filed under Epiphany, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year B

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