Sixth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 10A

Tract 1: Despising Our Birthright

Genesis 25:19-34
Psalm 119:105-112
Romans 8:1-11
Matthew 13:1-9,18-23

We all know the story of Jacob taking advantage of his brother Esau and stealing his birthright. From Genesis we read:

Once when Jacob was cooking a stew, Esau came in from the field, and he was famished. Esau said to Jacob, “Let me eat some of that red stuff, for I am famished!” (Therefore he was called Edom.) Jacob said, “First sell me your birthright.” Esau said, “I am about to die; of what use is a birthright to me?” Jacob said, “Swear to me first.” So he swore to him, and sold his birthright to Jacob. Then Jacob gave Esau bread and lentil stew, and he ate and drank, and rose and went his way. Thus Esau despised his birthright.   (Genesis 25:29-34)

Jacob and Esau were twins, but Esau was born first. Since he was the first-born, he stood in place to receive an inheritance passed down from his family. Yet, Esau was willing to give up his birthright for some stew. How could he do that? How could he be so stupid? How could he be so shortsighted?

Jesus told a parable about the sower sowing seed. The seed was the word of God. The seed fell on good ground which represents hearts open to his word. On the other hand, thorny ground was a different matter. Jesus explained:

As for what was sown among thorns, this is the one who hears the word, but the cares of the world and the lure of wealth choke the word, and it yields nothing.   (Matthew 13:22)

In his Sermon on the Mount Jesus said that we cannot serve two masters. We either serve God or Mammon (that is worldly riches). The desires of the flesh will choke out our spiritual inheritance just as it did for Esau.

These desires of the flesh will so poison our minds so that we will not even be able to comprehend the true riches of God. The Apostle Paul wrote:

For those who live according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the Spirit set their minds on the things of the Spirit. To set the mind on the flesh is death, but to set the mind on the Spirit is life and peace. For this reason the mind that is set on the flesh is hostile to God; it does not submit to God’s law– indeed it cannot, and those who are in the flesh cannot please God.   (Romans 8:5-8)

The commandments of God are what guarantee our spiritual inheritance. Jesus, our Savior, is the one who helps us keep those  commandments. The psalmist wrote:

Your decrees are my inheritance for ever;
truly, they are the joy of my heart.

I have applied my heart to fulfill your statutes
for ever and to the end.   (Psalm 119:111-112)

Do we find joy in following the commandments of God?

God has given us an eternal inheritance in his Kingdom through our faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. Nothing on earth today or in the world to come can compare with it.

 

 

Parable of the SowerTrack 2: Seed for the Heart

Isaiah 55:10-13
Psalm 65: (1-8), 9-14
Romans 8:1-11
Matthew 13:1-9,18-23

Today we have the parable of the Sower. The sower scatters the seed. What happens to that seed depends upon where it lands. Jesus said:

“Listen! A sower went out to sow. And as he sowed, some seeds fell on the path, and the birds came and ate them up. Other seeds fell on rocky ground, where they did not have much soil, and they sprang up quickly, since they had no depth of soil. But when the sun rose, they were scorched; and since they had no root, they withered away. Other seeds fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked them. Other seeds fell on good soil and brought forth grain, some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty. Let anyone with ears listen!”   (Matthew 13:3-9)

What is the seed? It is the very word of God, without which there would not be any life. We are the recipient of that life, provided that the word is planted in our hearts. Our hearts must be open to receiving God’s word. Without the word in our hearts we have no hope for salvation, no hope for eternal life with God.

This concept of the word as seed is not just New Testament. The Apostle Paul quotes Moses concerning the word of God and adds his commentary:

“The word is near you,
    on your lips and in your heart”

(that is, the word of faith that we proclaim); because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.   (Romans 10:5-9)

Is the word of God in our hearts? If so, then we will put our trust in the saving act of our Lord Jesus Christ. When our hearts are closed to the word then they are the hard ground that Jesus speaks about in the parable:

When anyone hears the word of the kingdom and does not understand it, the evil one comes and snatches away what is sown in the heart; this is what was sown on the path.   (Matthew 13:19)

Receiving the word is so important that the Devil will do everything in his power to keep that from happening. He will distract us with worldly cares. Jesus said;

As for what was sown among thorns, this is the one who hears the word, but the cares of the world and the lure of wealth choke the word, and it yields nothing.   (Matthew 13:22)

Worldly cares are the thorns which Jesus spoke about in the parable, which choke off the word. This is a favorite distraction by the Devil. You may remember that he even tried this technique with Jesus when he was in the wilderness:

The tempter came and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, command these stones to become loaves of bread.” But he answered, “It is written,

‘One does not live by bread alone,
    but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”   (Matthew 4:3-4)

To be sure, we are saved by grace through faith (). Faith is vital. God gives everyone a measure of faith. But we must feed our faith. Paul writes:

So then faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God.    (Romans 10:17)

The righteous live by faith, but faith will be diminished without a continual feeding on the word of God. The psalmist wrote:

With my whole heart I seek you;
    do not let me stray from your commandments.
I treasure your word in my heart,
    so that I may not sin against you.   (Psalm 119:10-12)

What kind of fruit we produce as Christians is very much dependent upon how we treasure the word in our hearts. In the parable Jesus said:

But as for what was sown on good soil, this is the one who hears the word and understands it, who indeed bears fruit and yields, in one case a hundredfold, in another sixty, and in another thirty.”   (Matthew 13:23)

Pray that our hearts are good soil, that we hear and understand. And that the cares of this world do not lead us astray. Pray that we treasure the word of God in our hearts. Amen.

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Filed under homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Pentecost, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year A

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