Second Sunday of Easter, Year A

Seeing is Believing or Believing is Seeing?

We remember the story of doubting Thomas. He could not believe in the resurrection without physical evidence, even though others had testified that they had seen the risen Lord. Thomas got his chance to believe when Jesus appeared to his disciples a second time:

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.” Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”  (John 20:26-29)

We should not be too hard on Thomas. His attitude represents for us a certain human skepticism that most of us share. Where does it come from? Perhaps it goes all the way back to the Garden of Eden. Satan tricked humankind to believe that we could be like God through a secret wisdom alone. It was just a matter of going around God who, supposedly, was keeping important information from us. Is that not the quest of science today? In fact, for some of today’s scientist,  their quest is an effort to disprove God altogether.

In reality, when it comes to God, physical proof does not work. The children of Israel saw more signs and wonders from God than anyone has ever seen. Yet, within a generation, they almost lost their belief in the God who brought them out of Egypt and nourished them in the wilderness. “Seeing is believing” did not seem to work for them, nor will it work in our day as well.

On the Day of Pentecost, the Apostle Peter testified, in part:

David spoke of the resurrection of the Messiah, saying,

‘He was not abandoned to Hades,
nor did his flesh experience corruption.’

This Jesus God raised up, and of that all of us are witnesses.”   (Acts 2:31)

The Apostles witness the resurrection of Jesus Christ first hand. Only a select few of people actually did. But their testimony has helped spread the Gospel around the world. Peter remarked:

Although you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and rejoice with an indescribable and glorious joy, for you are receiving the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls.   (1 Peter 1:8-9)

Personal testimonies are what touch people’s hearts. The risen Christ is very real to those who believe. They do not just have head knowledge. They have heart knowledge which is no less important. It may be even more important. This does not make Jesus any less real. It is just the God the Father has ordained faith as a required element in the conversion of souls. The Apostle Paul writes:

“The word is near you,
    on your lips and in your heart”

(that is, the word of faith that we proclaim); because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For one believes with the heart and so is justified, and one confesses with the mouth and so is saved.   (Romans 10:8-10)

Paul tells us what it means to be saved. We received the word of God. We received the testimony and we believed. John Wesley said that his hearts was strangely warmed. Faith changes us.

We did not see the resurrected Lord as did the early apostles, but Jesus has called us blessed:

“Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”

We have experienced Jesus within our hearts. Because we believed we have salvation in the name of Jesus. He can never be taken away from us if we hold him there. His life within us is transforming us more and more into his likeness. That transformation is our primary testimony and that is what changes the world. Many early Christian believers would not give up their testimony and were martyred for the Faith. Faith is all important because it guarantees an eternal inheritance with the Saints of light.

Let us go boldly into the world, as did Peter and the other apostles, and praise the glorious name of Jesus. “Believing is seeing.” May our belief help others to see.

Alleluia! He is risen!

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Filed under Easter, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, sermon preparation, Year A

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