Monday in the First Week of Lent

You Shall Be Holy

God has set a standard for us. In Leviticus we read:

You shall be holy for I the Lord your God is holy.   (Leviticus 19:2)

Holiness is not optional. It is a requirement of God. What does it mean? Fortunately, Leviticus has given examples of holiness:

You shall not steal; you shall not deal falsely; and you shall not lie to one another. And you shall not swear falsely by my name, profaning the name of your God: I am the Lord.

You shall not defraud your neighbor; you shall not steal; and you shall not keep for yourself the wages of a laborer until morning. You shall not revile the deaf or put a stumbling block before the blind; you shall fear your God: I am the Lord.

You shall not render an unjust judgment; you shall not be partial to the poor or defer to the great: with justice you shall judge your neighbor. You shall not go around as a slanderer among your people, and you shall not profit by the blood of your neighbor: I am the Lord.

You shall not hate in your heart anyone of your kin; you shall reprove your neighbor, or you will incur guilt yourself. You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against any of your people, but you shall love your neighbor as yourself: I am the Lord.   (Leviticus 19:11-18)

Obviously, holiness is not about the self but, rather, it has to do with how we treat others.  Jesus said:

for I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not give me clothing, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.’ Then they also will answer, ‘Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not take care of you?’ Then he will answer them, ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to me.’   (Matthew 25:42–45)

The good news is that true holiness is not possible by our own efforts. But with God all things are possible. First we must be sure that we fully embrace Jesus as Savior and Lord. Then, by dying to ourselves and taking up our cross, we grow into the mind of Christ by the power of the Holy Spirit. We gain a new perspective on the world around us from God’s point of view. We become the servants of those around us. This is the realm of holiness to which God is calling us this day.

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Filed under lectionary, Lent, Lenten daily readings, Lenten study, liturgical preaching, liturgy, Revised Common Lectionary, Year C

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