The Epiphany

adormagiVisitation of the Magi

The Epiphany event has to do with the visitation of the Magi or wise-men. The birth of Jesus would have gone unnoticed and did for most of the population. A group shepherds in the fields outside Bethlehem were informed by the heavenly hosts. But the Magi were able to discern that a major event had occurred through vigilant study and dedication of purpose. They had observed the night sky. They were not Jews but they were acquainted with the ancient writings and had sought out the sayings of the prophets:

“But you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah,
are by no means least among the rulers of Judah;
for out of you will come a ruler
who will shepherd my people Israel.”  (Micah 5:2,4)

God reveals himself to those who are seeking Him. Many are not seeking because they neither know themselves nor their creator. They do not even know to look. Matters beyond themselves are unimportant to them. There are people living in darkness that do not know they are in darkness. They have not yet seen the light and they are not even looking for the light. (It is interesting to note that many people today seek God through Eastern mysticism. We must remember that the best of the Eastern seekers of God bowed down to the Lord Jesus.)

The good news of Christ Jesus is for all people:

“Arise, shine, for your light has come,
and the glory of the LORD rises upon you.
See, darkness covers the earth
and thick darkness is over the peoples,
but the LORD rises upon you
and his glory appears over you.
Nations will come to your light,
and kings to the brightness of your dawn.  (Isaiah 60:1-3)

Are we seeking good news? To be wise one does not have to have all the answers. In fact, a wise person realizes that he or she does not have all the answers. Wisdom comes from the seeking. (Even Einstein had the humility to admit that much of his understanding concerning the theory of relativity came about by revelation. How many of today’s scientists would do that?)

The Apostle Paul writes that “the mystery was made known to me by revelation.” God is a mystery. Nevertheless, it is God’s desire to reveal Himself to those who will receive Him. Paul goes on to write:

In former generations this mystery was not made known to humankind, as it has now been revealed to his holy apostles and prophets by the Spirit: that is, the Gentiles have become fellow heirs, members of the same body, and sharers in the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel.  (Ephesians 3:5-6)

Paul further writes:

Although I am the very least of all the saints, this grace was given to me to bring to the Gentiles the news of the boundless riches of Christ, and to make everyone see what is the plan of the mystery hidden for ages in God who created all things; so that through the church the wisdom of God in its rich variety might now be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly places. This was in accordance with the eternal purpose that he has carried out in Christ Jesus our Lord, in whom we have access to God in boldness and confidence through faith in him.  (Ephesians 3:8-12)

The result of The Epiphany is to boldly seek the presence of God. The wisemen of old sought Jesus. They found Him and worshiped Him. They returned to their own people with joy in their hearts.

On the other hand, an Epiphany of God can be a fearful thing if we do not wish acknowledge him. It was for Herod:

In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, “Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising, and have come to pay him homage.” When King Herod heard this, he was frightened. …  (Matthew 2:1-3)

Herod did not want an epiphany of God. He was in charge and he wanted to keep it that way. What stops us from receiving our own epiphany? Are we ready to seek God’s face in this Season of Epiphany?

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Filed under Epiphany, homily, Jesus, lectionary, liturgical preaching, liturgy, preaching, Revised Common Lectionary, sermon, Year A

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